2022 Election – HDC Board Candidates

The HDC Election for At-large and Grid Representatives will run online from Thursday, April 7 at 7 pm to Tuesday, April 12 at 10 pm via Survey Monkey. Mail-in ballots will also be accepted and must be received by April 14 at noon. If you would like to receive a mail-in ballot, please call Kathy at 651-695-4005 or email info@highlanddistrictcouncil.org.

The following positions are up for election this year:

  • Two at-large representatives from any of the grids in Highland Park. You may vote for up to two candidates. The individuals who receive the 3rd and 4th highest votes will be named at-large alternate representatives. You may vote for up to two candidates.
  • One representative from grids 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 11 and 12. Click here to find your grid. You may only vote for candidates in your grid.

Click here to find your grid and use the search box in the upper left corner of the website to enter your address. All HDC residents 18+ can vote in the At-Large election, even if your grid isn’t up for election this year.

Learn about all of the candidates below. At-Large candidates introduced themselves during HDC’s Annual Meeting on April 7 – watch the recording at https://www.facebook.com/HighlandDistrictCouncil/live/.

Vote Online for At-large and Grid Representatives Here: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/HDC2022election (online ballot closes at 10pm on April 12)

If you prefer to submit a paper ballot, please email kathy@highlanddistrictcouncil.org or call the HDC office at 651.695.4005. Mail-in ballots must be received by Thursday, April 14 at noon. You may only vote via online ballot or via mail-in.

At-Large Candidates

There are two (2) at-large positions to fill this year. You may vote for up to two candidates.

Casey Andersen

Grid 12

Tell us about yourself and how you can best leverage your strengths to represent your grid and the Highland Park Community.      

I have lived in St. Paul for 18 years, the last 11 of those in Highland Park.  It has been a great community to be part of with my family (husband, 2 boys and a pup), and while being involved in many aspects of real estate (residential, renovations, and commercial project management).    I enjoy being outside, hiking and skiing, gardening, cooking and am always adding something new to the project list.  There’s a web that connects the different parts of my life to other people and we can find a way to relate.

What makes the Highland District Council mission meaningful to you?    

The best part of my day is often the small, unexpected interactions with the people around me.  And those people are the heart of Highland Park.  We need businesses here, we need schools, activities, events, space, and transportation.  We need all these features to prosper to keep us here and looking out for each other.

When considering new development, how would you balance the desires of the present community with those of future community members?    

I’m generally pro development because very high level we need to maintain the appeal of the neighborhood.  I think that incorporates a certain level of modernity, cleanliness, safety, and energy that comes from fresh ideas, businesses and buildings.  That can call happen while respecting and coordinating with existing community, ideally by keeping the existing community engaged and active.

How would you prioritize transportation resources (such as space and funding) for people walking, biking, and driving?                

There’s a tricky balance.  It’s great to promote walking and biking, and there’s a demand for it, but we are a car based city and that can’t be ignored.  Each transportation proposal needs to be considered on its own, weighing the space, demand, cost, safety, etc.

How would you consider the needs and desires of members of the community who face obstacles to participation in the public process?

I would encourage neighbors to get to know each other and have conversations about the community.  We can work to represent each other and make our neighbors heard.


Isaac Russell

Grid Number 5

Tell us about yourself and how you can best leverage your strengths to represent your grid and the Highland Park Community.      

I represented 11 neighborhoods in Minneapolis on an advisory commission to the City, where I gained tremendous insights on the work of organizations like the District Councils while also extensively volunteering. I also have extensive experience working in a volunteer capacity with my local Senate District and on the Executive Board for the African American Caucus. Lastly, i work extensively with a wide swath of local nonprofits. I was born in St. Paul, and have lived in many places across St. Paul throughout my life.

What makes the Highland District Council mission meaningful to you?    

I believe a strong community requires close, reciprocal relationships with business, political, and community leaders. I have worked extensively with political leaders during my decade-long career in the MN State Senate. I currently work for a nonprofit dedicated to building an equitable economy, and we work extensively to connect the concerns of community members, businesses working towards equitable work practices, and political leaders dedicated to improving equitable economies. Personally, as a person of color in a blended family, I think see the need to include all groups in our community to build a common sense of “we” while recognizes the diversity of our neighborhoods.

When considering new development, how would you balance the desires of the present community with those of future community members?    

I ask myself “what is our vision?” Where do we see ourselves going? And what means do we have to get there, and if they are inadequate, is it possible to build those means? So we must make sure perceived benefits of a current initiative do not hand costs to future community members that exceeds their benefits.

How would you prioritize transportation resources (such as space and funding) for people walking, biking, and driving?                

I would rely on extensive input from our community because they can articulate and identify their own needs. We need to encourage pedestrian transportation, but their safety must be maintained, and this requires honest assessments of our streets. I think we need to make sure all three groups feel they have a place in this city and see themselves in our future.

How would you consider the needs and desires of members of the community who face obstacles to participation in the public process?

We need to make sure we hold public meetings in accessible places, but this is the low bar. We also need to be prepared to provide sign language interpreter, printed materials in different languages, and outreach to historically marginalized communities. We also must be responsive ourselves when people contact us, so we must make time available to have these discussions.


Jeff Stolte

Grid Number 7

Tell us about yourself and how you can best leverage your strengths to represent your grid and the Highland Park Community.  

I am a 31 year Saint Paul resident, living in Highland Park grid 7 for 16 years with my wife and two sons, ages 16 and 12.  Like others who have made their home in Saint Paul, I value family and friends, recreation, and sports.  In January I became an At Large Alternate for HDC, becoming a member of the Community Engagement Committee and filling in for absent HDC Board Members.  So far this year we are off to a good start with many community engagement opportunities already scheduled and completed, for example: I really enjoyed helping with the Winter Fun event with Parks and Recreation at the Highland Park Community Center.  Those kids had a blast and really enjoyed the hot chocolate, bonfire, and sledding event.  We have more activities for Highland Park kids in May with First Tee for a free Spring Golf Event at Highland National (more details to come).  Highland Park kids should be outside having fun, and I think you would agree.

What makes the Highland District Council mission meaningful to you?    

Residents of Highland Park and the local businesses are entitled to safe spaces, where we are free to participate in the community without fear of crime.  That being said, many of us have experienced or have seen how crime has changed how we participate in the community, and I know what it is like to be a victim as it effects you.  I’ve had a chance to meet our Western District Senior Police Commander and ask questions of his staff, and have been able to participate in both the Transportation and Development Committees to express community concerns.  There are already very positive improvements, and collectively we can make it better.

When considering new development, how would you balance the desires of the present community with those of future community members?    

When considering change, it should be measured so to not harm how existing residents participate in the community without considering their voice.  I very much appreciated the opportunity in February to listen to and ask questions of the Ramsey County Public Works Director and Saint Paul’s Street Design and Construction Division Manager, where I asked if we were getting what we paid for with road construction in Highland Park.  In keeping with community expectations I’d like to see that contractors performing at higher standards, that do not take shortcuts, are retained for better results.

How would you prioritize transportation resources (such as space and funding) for people walking, biking, and driving?                

I’d balance the needs for all modes of transportation.  Maintaining our current throughput of public roads free and clear of ice and snow is important, but now that the snow has melted attention should shift toward bike path and pothole repairs as many Highland Park roads remain in terrible shape and need attention.  Safety is also an issue, so highlighting where lighting is poor or where it is unsafe for our residents to cross the street can help prioritize funding for these projects with city and county staff.

How would you consider the needs and desires of members of the community who face obstacles to participation in the public process?

I’ve had the chance to meet my neighbors and hear their concerns, and I look forward to meeting many more.  It is important that we are flexible to accommodate members of the community on varying work schedules, or for those members that have a disability so that their voices are heard and they can contribute.  I would keep a notebook to document their needs, and be an advocate for the neighborhood and Highland Park community.  Vote for Jeff.


Kevin Vargas

Grid Number 9

Tell us about yourself and how you can best leverage your strengths to represent your grid and the Highland Park Community.      

My name is Kevin Vargas and I’m running for re-election on the Highland District Council. I live with my husband on Cleveland Ave where we’ve lived for the last several years and expect to be for the next 30 years because we love everything about our neighborhood: from the beautiful Hidden Falls Park and Mississippi River to the amazing local businesses and restaurants. Professionally, I’m a corporate strategist and I hope to use the skills I’ve gained through my graduate education and career to benefit the Highland District Council for a second term.

What makes the Highland District Council mission meaningful to you?    

Above all, I love the sense of community in Highland Park and our work on the council to further the mission. As the first-born child of immigrants, I know how important it is to feel welcomed and safe in a community, so I want to extend the same hospitality my parents received when they came to this country Our neighborhood is an incredibly welcoming place and I want to continue building our sense of community through partnerships with community members, local businesses, and our elected officials.

When considering new development, how would you balance the desires of the present community with those of future community members?    

As vice-chair of the council’s development committee, I saw firsthand how complex and varied the community’s needs are when it comes to new development. As our neighborhood grows, we must be ready to meet the needs of future neighbors who want to join our amazing community while ensuring current needs of the existing community members are met, whether it’s issues of public safety, transportation, or sense of community. With your support, I’m confident we can make progress in Highland Park while remaining true to the kind of neighborhood we have all grown to cherish.

How would you prioritize transportation resources (such as space and funding) for people walking, biking, and driving?                

We must ensure that we maintain smart street, bike lane, and sidewalk design/infrastructure to promote safety for cyclists and pedestrians in our community, especially children and neighbors with mobility issues. The future of our planet depends on not only biking and walking, but also transit, which starts with investing in smart transit routes that meet the current needs of the neighborhood and set up our community for sensible transit options in the future. If re-elected, I will continue to work with the transportation committee to partner with stakeholders like the City Council and Metro Transit to prioritize the needs of Highland Park.

How would you consider the needs and desires of members of the community who face obstacles to participation in the public process?

Ensuring accessible, easy participation is tricky but crucial to the work of the Highland District Council. We need to be honest with ourselves and determine who doesn’t have a seat at the table and ensure we reach out so that those community members feel welcomed and empowered to contribute their ideas and participate in our community-building. We aren’t perfect at the Highland District Council, and I will push ourselves to do even better this year.

Grid Candidates

Only grids 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 11 and 12 are up for election in 2021. You may only vote for candidates in your grid. Click here to find your grid.

Grid 2

Tim Morehead

Tell us about yourself and how you can best leverage your strengths to represent your grid and the Highland Park Community.

I have lived in Highland for over 25 years and in the City of St. Paul all my life, which gives me a good understanding of the history, culture, challenges and opportunities of this great city and the Highland neighborhood.  My working experience in the telecommunication, construction, security and education arenas has given me some good knowledge to apply in the Highland Park Community.  I also have served on Highland District Council for three years and as chair of the councils Community Development Committee.

What makes the Highland District Council mission meaningful to you?    

What better mission statement could a community have than this to cover all the basics of our lives.  The key point of engaging and connecting with people and entities is paramount to living a worthwhile life.  This is a steppingstone to building this vibrant, welcoming and safe community, which is very positive and forward looking for a better future in our neighborhood and the world in general.

When considering new development, how would you balance the desires of the present community with those of future community members?    

New development is always a challenge because no one can accurately predict the future.  Through my life I have seen so much change which can be hard for some people, but what has helped me is continuously maintaining a good education and understanding on everything around us.  I have raised four daughters and have several grandchildren, which constantly reminds of how things are changing and can see how the world is affecting them as they grow.  My experience has shown me that if everyone works together in a collaborative effort with a “win/win” attitude, future development will be created for the common good of all.

How would you prioritize transportation resources (such as space and funding) for people walking, biking, and driving?

As with new development, transportation has its own challenges as well, because we are sharing limited space for all of these types of uses.  I believe the key is to maximize the utilization of this limited resource without having one transportation type (walking, biking, and driving) getting an advantage at the expense of another type of transportation need.  Again, a collaborative effort with a win/win approach should help develop the best transportation system that will benefit the whole community and maximize the limited resources we have.  Funding will always be an issue, but prioritization and maximizing the utilization of the transportation space will help.  Other cities and countries have done this and we can learn from their examples. 

How would you consider the needs and desires of members of the community who face obstacles to participation in the public process?

First of all, we need to educate ourselves on the obstacles that are out there for some members of our community.  I know there are available resources to get us more knowledgeable on these needs.  Once we get this education and understanding, we can use our collaborative efforts, that I have been stressing, to develop solutions to the obstacles. 


Grid 4

Kathleen Erin Doyle Anderson

Tell us about yourself and how you can best leverage your strengths to represent your grid and the Highland Park Community.      

My husband and I returned to the area from NYC with our three young children shortly before the pandemic.  While home with my children, I yearned for community connection and making an impact beyond the four walls of our home and have become involved with various advocacy and community groups, including serving on the HDC’s Community Engagement Committee for the last year and a half.  I bring my energy, empathy, sense of humor and relationship-building skills, as well as my professional experience and values as a clinical social worker, to best serve the diverse needs of my community.

What makes the Highland District Council mission meaningful to you?    

In my time serving on the HDC’s Community Engagement Committee, I’ve focused on moving the council from being well-intentioned to intentional: how do we better foster opportunities for ALL the people in Highland to engage and connect? How do we help build a more vibrant, welcoming, and safe neighborhood for ALL?  When we moved here 2.5 years ago, my family was welcomed with open arms and quickly found connection and a sense of home, despite the pandemic, and I want to replicate that sense of belonging and safety for all of my neighbors.  I’ve spent the past 1.5 years working with a subset of the council on moving the Equity Plan forward, identifying areas for opportunity and growth in our engagement and outreach, brainstorming ways to authentically show up for our neighbors, and spearheading knowledge exchange with other District Councils to identify barriers to participation and new, more inclusive ways of operating and offering programming.

When considering new development, how would you balance the desires of the present community with those of future community members?    

I am passionate about open dialogue and hearing from all sides.  I love research, feedback, and discussion, but my personal and professional values call me to advocate for those who are historically excluded from power: namely, children – who are inheriting catastrophic climate change, the disabled – who deserve access and the freedom of movement and inclusion, and working families – who are struggling with the rising cost of housing.  I love the historic charm of my home as much as anyone, but we cannot meet the moment, nor the needs of future community members, by endlessly pining for the way things “used to be”. We have to be creative, open-minded, humble, hopeful, and future-oriented.

How would you prioritize transportation resources (such as space and funding) for people walking, biking, and driving?                

I’ll be the first to acknowledge that this isn’t my area of expertise, having invested my time on the Community Engagement Committee.  Nonetheless, I believe that most people want to be able to safely and reliably use all three modes of transportation depending on the weather and their own needs/abilities.  We have the largest historical investment in roads and parking and those need to be thoughtfully updated and maintained; however, we need to do more to incentivize others modes of transportation, namely by ensuring safe routes and crossings for pedestrians and cyclists, and the use of sustainable public transit options.

How would you consider the needs and desires of members of the community who face obstacles to participation in the public process?

Fundamentally, we need to be in the community asking neighbors for input and showing them that we care. My focus on the Community Engagement Committee has included the development of an Engagement Survey to better capture whom the HDC is reaching and what prevents community members from participating.  I’ve connected with other District Councils to identify the very practical ways they’re reduced barriers to engagement (including meeting, Board and voting structure, relevancy of programming, etc.) and brought findings back to the District Council, including proposing the hiring of a community organizer. We all have a role to play in engagement and all elected Board Members need to be prepared to take on that fundamental role.


Grid 6

Ellen Miller

Tell us about yourself and how you can best leverage your strengths to represent your grid and the Highland Park Community.      

I am a former exhibit developer (MNHS 1992-2015) and public library director (LeClaire, IA 2016-2021). Over the years, I have worked effectively with boards, city administrators and councils, and various outside groups. I like being beings immersed in my local community, and in this case, I have an active interest in Highland’s community and commercial development. In my professional capacity, I have a strong record of getting the job done.

What makes the Highland District Council mission meaningful to you?    

Like most people, I am looking to deepen my connection to my community. Now that I am an empty nester, and nearing retirement, I have the desire and time to act on it. I love living in Highland Park. I am an enthusiastic booster. There are so many resources here. I want people to know how lucky they are to live here.

When considering new development, how would you balance the desires of the present community with those of future community members?    

I would remind people that there are always positives and negatives. I was not living here for the Highland Bridge debate. I understand (and rightly so) neighbors were fearful about the increase in density and traffic. However, we will be getting four new parks, ten miles of trails, an updated and expanded grocery store, and the promise (hopefully) of much needed commercial redevelopment.

How would you prioritize transportation resources (such as space and funding) for people walking, biking, and driving?                

The beauty of Highland is its walkability. I want to keep it that way. For instance, if they redevelop the soon to be vacated Lunds space, let’s lose the big parking lot in front, and move whatever they build closer to the street. Let’s make this a small town main street within a big city. My priorities are walkability within the commercial district, and expanded bike trails (old RR line at Ford site).

How would you consider the needs and desires of members of the community who face obstacles to participation in the public process?

I would try to get information kiosks or tables into the places that people might already go. For instance setting up topical feedback stations at the local, library, schools, or grocery store.


Grid 6

Georgia E Dietz

Tell us about yourself and how you can best leverage your strengths to represent your grid and the Highland Park Community.

I have lived in Highland since 1986, after having moved to St Paul to attend St Catherine University and consider myself an active member of the Highland community. In October, prior to the HDC’s decision to agree with Ramsey County to reduce St Paul Avenue to one lane each way, I spent 6 hours putting fliers in my neighbor’s doors to make sure they knew about the on-line meeting and vote. Getting information into the hands of my neighbors and members of the community has always been a priority for me; thru in-person contact or Villager letters to the editor.

What makes the Highland District Council mission meaningful to you?    

The district councils were created to foster “citizen participation”. So often I speak to neighbors who have never heard of district councils, especially the HDC, and seem to have no knowledge of its existence. If one doesn’t receive the Villager, which is going to subscription only, which the HDC uses as its notifier of events, it’s difficult to be involved. The HDC has a somewhat negative impression for me, in that it seems to have become a rubber stamp for whatever the city or county brings to it for approval, instead of what would be best for the citizens of Highland. Since the district council is the place where people can be most involved in decisions which affect them, whether it be traffic, street maintenance, development, safety, I would expect fewer unanimous decisions and more real discussion.

When considering new development, how would you balance the desires of the present community with those of future community members?    

Since the present community members are the ones paying the property taxes in Highland right now, I would say they have the most to gain or lose when it comes to development in Highland. The VIllage is a huge development in Highland and the planners take into account the impact it will have on our community, but I see the HDC already cutting traffic lanes before the thousands of new residents move to Highland. Voting to take away the mandated number of parking spaces, which the HDC did, hardly takes into account future community members’ needs to shop in Highland.

How would you prioritize transportation resources (such as space and funding) for people walking, biking, and driving?                

Since the large majority of community members use cars to do their shopping, participate in school activities, go to work, or other needed, trips, I think the largest share of transportation funds should be used for the maintenance and easy access on roads for automobiles. Seeing the traffic jams at the corners of Ford Parkway and Cleveland Avenue on a daily basis, I think the case can be made that more thoughtful discussion on how to fix these problems and more dollars be used to ease traffic problems in Highland, which does not include simply cutting traffic lanes.

How would you consider the needs and desires of members of the community who face obstacles to participation in the public process?

Your question above, as to how a prospective board member would involve him or herself, does not include going door to door as a grid member because, unless a Highland Community member knows of planned activities, how can they attend? I see the real issue for the HDC as being how to involve everyone as much as possible, as a postcard and flyer once a year only engages people who are already fairly engaged. I think there should be more than just one annual meeting held for all to attend, meet each other and express their views on what’s best for Highland.


Grid 8

Tom Distad

Tell us about yourself and how you can best leverage your strengths to represent your grid and the Highland Park Community.      

I am a Highland Park resident & Realtor, active in local development and an avid walker and runner.  I think some of the most visible ways residents interact with their local community is neighborhood development and transportation. I value the community that I work and live in, and am invested in bring out its best.

What makes the Highland District Council mission meaningful to you?    

I think it’s important that everyone feel safe, welcomed and heard.  I think it’s especially important that we help ensure that it isn’t just the loudest voices that always be heard.  I think it’s important to try to engage everyone.

When considering new development, how would you balance the desires of the present community with those of future community members?    

I think it’s important that we try to listen and engage with current residents to ensure that all concerns are heard. It’s also important that we understand and convey the future needs of the city and it’s residents.  The city has rezoned many areas in favor of density and it is important that it is made clear that these are the decisions of the city council and mayor.

How would you prioritize transportation resources (such as space and funding) for people walking, biking, and driving?                

I don’t believe in a one sized fits all approach to this question.  I am a firm believer that accessible running, biking and walking trails are great modes of transportation, but also add to desirability of a neighborhood. 

How would you consider the needs and desires of members of the community who face obstacles to participation in the public process?

I think more zoom conversations are great.  I also think trying to send out e-blasts with polls to the neighbors would be great.  Many people won’t show up to say they’re fine with something, it’s typically the most passionate people.


Grid 10

Joseph Satter

Tell us about yourself and how you can best leverage your strengths to represent your grid and the Highland Park Community.

I have been working in nonprofit association management for 20+ years and have experience working with volunteer board members and with various committees on projects that support and enhance the community. I like to strategically look at problems and work to identify paths to make positive change happen. I enjoy collaboration, and look forward to this opportunity to work together with the board to serve our neighborhood.

What makes the Highland District Council mission meaningful to you?    

I’m a life-long resident of the Twin Cities and appreciate how unique the Highland Park neighborhood is, in so many ways. Positive outcomes don’t happen without putting in significant effort; and I think the Council gives a voice and vision to our neighborhood and truly works to support the goals of residents, businesses, and institutions. By staying connected to who the HDC represents, we can work to ensure Highland Park is a model of a dynamic, diverse, and welcoming community.

When considering new development, how would you balance the desires of the present community with those of future community members?    

We have to be conscientious of how any new development impacts existing areas, from both the residential and business perspectives. Change just for the sake of change is not something I tend to support. Whenever possible, any new development should support and enhance what’s existing and valued in our community, and also bring in new options and opportunity.

How would you prioritize transportation resources (such as space and funding) for people walking, biking, and driving?                

It’s important to support and maintain options for walking, biking, driving, and Metro Transit bus service for those traveling to, from, and through Highland Park. I think safety, access, and environmental impact are key priorities that should inform any decisions to be made regarding allocating resources. And I want to make sure that our neighbors with limited resources and fewer transportation options can still get around and access what they need.

How would you consider the needs and desires of members of the community who face obstacles to participation in the public process?

I think it’s important to find out what the obstacles are to their participation. Is it a lack of information on public meetings and the process, an inability to attend based on time of day/location, a belief that their views are not welcomed and don’t influence policy decisions, or something else? Whatever the reason, we need to be conscious and deliberate in outreach efforts to show everyone in the community that we care, that we are here to listen, and that we want and truly value their participation.


Grid 10

Jillian Barden

Tell us about yourself and how you can best leverage your strengths to represent your grid and the Highland Park Community.      

I hope to bring a fresh set of eyes and a new perspective to the meetings. As a mother, I want to advocate for child health and wellbeing. I want to promote a safe and equitable place for every resident of Highland, and the visitors.

What makes the Highland District Council mission meaningful to you?    

The mission of the Highland District Council is meaningful to me because being inclusive, creating opportunities, and still having fun is important in my daily life, and I know it’s important for the beautiful residents of Highland Park

When considering new development, how would you balance the desires of the present community with those of future community members?    

Compromise. The best compromise is the one that makes the most sense and will benefit the most people, while still adding in key features of the opposing side.

How would you prioritize transportation resources (such as space and funding) for people walking, biking, and driving?                

There has to be compromise with sensibility involved. I would like to see statistics and reasoning which make sense in order to prioritize the funding, and why it should go into that channel. It has to be fair and equally accessible, and the desires of the community members, which I would be representing.

How would you consider the needs and desires of members of the community who face obstacles to participation in the public process?

Canvass the area, put my feet to the street. I would also encourage communication with the community via email, text or phone. I would even be open to appts.


Grid 11

Fekadu Ayichew

Tell us about yourself and how you can best leverage your strengths to represent your grid and the Highland Park Community.      

My greatest strengths are open-mindedness, curiosity, dedication, enthusiasm and flexibility so that I can best represent my grid and the Highland Park Community.

What makes the Highland District Council mission meaningful to you?    

Yes, it is meaningful to me. Because we are strongly working on:
Resident safety
Pedestrian Safety/Education
Neighborhood enhancements

When considering new development, how would you balance the desires of the present community with those of future community members?

When we think of any development plan it needs to create a balance in the desire of the generations. I believe that this generation is supposed to do something for the future generation. So, we as a generation will make a better, and stronger community.

How would you prioritize transportation resources (such as space and funding) for people walking, biking, and driving?                

I can prioritize walking, biking, and driving. I am an expert in transport.  Walking and cycling get my attention and need more priority than driving, because they benefit health, air quality, and community.

How would you consider the needs and desires of members of the community who face obstacles to participation in the public process?

I consider the needs and desires of members of the community who face obstacles to participation in the public process are due to lack of awareness among members, poor communication, lack of information sharing, and others


.

Grid 12

Cheryl A Calloway

Tell us about yourself and how you can best leverage your strengths to represent your grid and the Highland Park Community.      

I have lived in Highland Park for about 4 years and have experience sitting on boards of directors and serving in other leadership positions. The board has few renters among its members, and I want to bring representation of renter’s issues and concerns to the board and its various committees. I also am a person of color and hope to be able to provide a different perspective to the Board and its members reflecting equity concerns as well as life experiences different from many of the board members.

What makes the Highland District Council mission meaningful to you?    

I fully support the mission statement and want to lend my skills and talents to helping it be meaningful to the people and visitors to the Highland area.  One way to help make the mission real and alive for people is to increase the numbers of people of color and renters on the Board. Many times, the issues affecting living, working, learning and playing in Highland are different for people of color and renters and those issues need to be brought to the attention of the Board and its committees, so that all residents and potential residents of Highland can be part of a vibrant, welcoming and safe neighborhood.

When considering new development, how would you balance the desires of the present community with those of future community members?    

Change is always a difficult thing to deal with and with changing demographics affecting St Paul and the Highland area in particular, will bring a new challenge to achieving a balance in development needs and desires.  I would look at the proposed development and examine the potential beneficiaries of the development, make a determination of the extent to which the proposed development will comply with the mission statement, examine equity, diversity and possible discrimination effects of the proposed development, ask questions to get a full understanding of the reasons for the proposed development and then make a decision to be discussed with the Board and its relevant committees.

How would you prioritize transportation resources (such as space and funding) for people walking, biking, and driving?                

There will always be driving in the Highland area, so the existence of well-maintained roads is essential. There are also people who use public transportation as their primary means of getting around, and we need to ensure that they have access to busses and rail that are clean, safe, timely and easily accessible, particularly for young children, the differently-abled and the elderly. My third priority is walking and riding and we need safe walking and riding paths for children, those trying to reach religious institutions and other locations, and recreational activities by examining the County and City plans regarding walking and riding opportunities, talking with residents who engage in those activities and reaching conclusions and making recommendations that will ensure increased opportunity that is safe for all.

How would you consider the needs and desires of members of the community who face obstacles to participation in the public process?

I would look to work with our PR team on new or different methods to increase participation, including getting written materials prepared in the languages of our residents, talking with landlords to see if they will allow Council activities at their facilities (at little to no cost) and allow the posting of Council announcements, and increasing local business advertising of Council activities. Advertise Council activities in newspapers or other publications read by people of color who live in the Highland Area. Determine if our handouts can be made available on public transportation that serve the Highland area.